Trapers — traped .giffiti

 

You have to check out this Tum­blr: http://trapers.net/ I absolutely love it.


The Everyday Lives Of Furries Photographed By Tom Broadbent

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Zuki, a Gar­goyle at home. Zuki lives in Mil­ton Keynes and works in IT. Zuki owns a few suits, the gar­goyle is just one of them.

First rule of Fur Club: don’t reveal your iden­tity. Sec­ond rule of Fur Club: don’t talk to journalists.

British pho­tog­ra­pher Tom Broad­bent has been get­ting to know var­i­ous “Fur­ries” through­out the UK for the last few years. Fur­ries are every­day peo­ple, from bank man­agers to project man­agers to actors, who dress up in elab­o­rate furry ani­mal cos­tumes and meet up to chat and hang out. Furry groups have been spot­ted walk­ing around London’s St. Paul’s Cathe­dral and Mil­len­nium Bridge.

At Home With the Fur­ries is Broadbent’s ongo­ing project, born from a desire to cap­ture the per­sonal, every­day side of their lives with­out break­ing that first Furry rule. Broad­bent plans to exhibit and pub­lish this unique series, so keep an eye out for that.

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Ken Russell’s Altered States

We’re all try­ing to ful­fill our­selves, under­stand our­selves, get in touch with our­selves, face the real­ity of our­selves, explore our­selves, expand our­selves. Ever since we dis­pensed with God we’ve got noth­ing but our­selves to explain this mean­ing­less hor­ror of life.”
–Eddie Jessup

It’s a tes­ta­ment to the sheer will­ful­ness of John Corigliano’s chal­leng­ing score that dur­ing a view­ing of Altered States (1980) the sound­track mirac­u­lously holds its own against Ken Rus­sell’s visual orgies of Para­janov­ian icono­graphic tableaux, each esca­lat­ing in insan­ity as we delve head-long (and nightmare-deep) into a highly sub­jec­tive hero’s jour­ney from hope­less­ness towards redemption.

Though Paddy Chayef­sky’s script cov­ers sev­eral years in the courtship, mar­riage, and sep­a­ra­tion of two dri­ven Ivy league aca­d­e­mic pro­fes­sion­als, pro­tag­o­nist Jes­sup (William Hurt) painfully and glar­ingly can not bring him­self to say “I love you” to his part­ner until the last line of the movie. If the L-word’s con­spic­u­ous absence hangs over the resul­tant daz­zlingly brazen hal­lu­ci­na­tory pro­ceed­ings, Jes­sup is haunted in his state of arrested devel­op­ment by another word that fills the wounded neg­a­tive space left in a soul lack­ing love: “ter­ri­ble,” both a defin­ing word and world­view that Jes­sup declares at the film’s out­set of hav­ing con­tracted dur­ing his father’s drawn out death of cancer.


One day I thought I heard him say some­thing. I got up and leaned over him, my ear an inch away from his lips. ‘Did you say some­thing, Pop?’ Then I heard the word he was des­per­ately try­ing to say, a soft hiss of a word. He was say­ing… ‘terrible.’…Terrible. So the end was ter­ri­ble, even for the good peo­ple like my father, so the pur­pose of all our suf­fer­ing was just more suffering.”

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Lis­ten­ing to Corigliano’s tracks on their own, divorced from Russell’s ver­tig­i­nous com­pli­men­tary imagery, it is easy to imag­ine that you are lost within a con­found­ing, con­fus­ing, cold, and harsh uni­verse that may never truly make sense.

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Liberace — Behind The Candelabra

Steven Soder­bergh is in the midst of his final jaunt behind the cam­era, in pro­duc­tion on the Lib­er­ace biopic “Behind The Can­de­labra”, with Michael Dou­glas as the famed per­former and Matt Damon as his young lover. Lib­er­ace was famed for being the world’s highest-paid enter­tainer at one point, and enjoyed his for­tune with an extrav­a­gant lifestyle. Soder­bergh revealed that while plans are still com­ing together for the movie, which is set up at HBO, he hopes to take it to Cannes on May 2013.

The movie is based on the book “Behind the Can­de­labra: My Life With Lib­er­ace” writ­ten by Liberace’s lover Scott Thor­son who met him when when he was sev­en­teen in 1976. Lib­er­ace had promised Thor­son, who was raised in fos­ter homes, that he would adopt and care for him and even­tu­ally the per­former incor­po­rated his lover into his lav­ish Las Vegas stage performances.

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Liberace’s story is tragic and his rela­tion­ship with Scott Thor­son was not less extrav­a­gant than some of his out­fits. Lib­er­ace always pub­licly denied that he was homo­sex­ual and insisted that Thor­son was never his lover. He went to great lengths until his dead from AIDS to cover his sex­u­al­ity. To get an idea of how eccen­tric their life was, read the fol­low­ing excerpt from an inter­view with Scott Thor­sonon on Larry King Live that aired on August 12, 2002:

Thor­son: Well, he brought the sur­geons in. I picked him up in my Rolls-Royce. I drove. They were in Las Vegas. I picked him up and brought him to a Las Vegas man­sion on Shirley Street. And Lee was intro­duced to the doc­tor and he says, “I want you to come with me.” And Lee walked him through — went into the — you know, into the bed­room and said — there was a pic­ture of Lib­er­ace. Oh, I guess he was prob­a­bly in his 30s, Larry. He says, “I want you to cre­ate Scott to look like me when he was younger; so he looks like my son.” He wanted me as his son. But at the same time, he wanted me as his lover.

The romance ended due to the pianist’s sex­ual promis­cu­ity and Thorson’s drug addic­tion, which led him to con­tract Hepati­tis C. In 1982, Thor­son filed a $113 mil­lion law­suit against Lib­er­ace, with the pal­imony suit being the more famous part. But in 1986, the pair report­edly set­tled out of court for $95,000, two cars, and two pet dogs.

Scott rec­on­ciled with Lib­er­ace on his death bed, and a year later pub­lished the book Behind the Can­de­labra: My Life With Lib­er­ace on which the film is based.

Watch below a short clip of Liberace’s Entrance to a las vegas show, fea­tur­ing all the glam­our and glit­ter only Lee Him­self could pull off.… Frea­tur­ing Scott Thor­son as the lim­ou­sine Driver.

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Once Upon a Honeymoon

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When our soci­ety went from “buy­ing to replace” to “buy to be happy”, the effect snow­balled over the decades with the force needed to keep from expe­ri­enc­ing a real exis­ten­tial crisis.

Once Upon a Hon­ey­moon is a 1956 musi­cal spon­sored film about a cou­ple wish­ing for a new home. It starts off with a group of angels who decide to help a cou­ple have a hon­ey­moon. The hus­band (Jeff) tries to write a song, while the wife (Mary) day­dreams about a new home, and imag­ines what it would be like to have the lat­est house­hold prod­ucts with the help of the angel. The angel then helps the man come up with a new song called “A Cas­tle in the Sky”.

The film was directed by Gower Cham­pion, and starred Vir­ginia Gib­son, Ward Ellis, Alan Mow­bray, Chick Chan­dler, Veron­ica Pataky and Rus­sell Hicks. In recent years the film has gained a small fol­low­ing, after it was mocked on the show Mys­tery Sci­ence The­ater 3000. It is in the pub­lic domain.


The Tropical Islands (WTF?!) Indoor Beach Resort

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If you were in Ger­many and had a giant for­mer Soviet mil­i­tary air­base in your back­yard, what would you do? Build an indoor trop­i­cal resort com­plete with white sandy beaches, palm trees and heaps of white tourists in Speedos, right? RIGHT!!!?? Well that’s exactly what happened.

The approx­i­mately 1181 feet long, 689 feet wide and 351 feet tall hangar designed to house air­ships that probs would’ve been used to kill heaps of peo­ple, is now the home of the Trop­i­cal Islands Resort. The lux­ury ‘beach’ get­away can accom­mo­date up to 6000 guests not includ­ing the 500 peo­ple who work their every­day. Through purely unnat­ural means, the joint is kept at a lovely 26 degrees cel­sius with around about 64% humidity.

Oh and btw, there’s snow out­side. Heaps of it. Cov­er­ing the mil­i­tary hangar which has a beach resort in it. In Ger­many, where else?.


David Cronenberg’s Videodrome

The pres­i­dent of Civic TV Chan­nel 83, Max Renn, is always look­ing for new cheap and erotic movies for his station.

When his employee, Har­lan, decodes a pirate video broad­cast show­ing tor­ture, mur­der, and muti­la­tion called “Video­drome,” Max becomes obsessed to get this series for his channel.

He con­tacts his sup­plier, Masha, and asks her to find the party respon­si­ble for the transmission.

A cou­ple of days later, Masha tells that “Video­drome” is real snuff movies. Max’s sado-masochistic girl­friend Nicki Brand decides to travel to Pitts­burgh, where the show is based, to audition.

Max inves­ti­gates fur­ther, and through a video by the media prophet Brian O’Blivion, he learns that that TV screens are the retina of the mind’s eye, being part of the brain, and “Video­drome” trans­mis­sions cre­ate a brain tumor in the viewer, chang­ing the real­ity through video hallucination.


Room 237

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For those who are not fans of The Shin­ing, Room 237 may not appear to be your kind of film, but look past the sub­ject of its analy­sis and you still have an inter­est­ing and sub­ver­sive doc­u­men­tary. Rod­ney Ascher’s ado­ra­tion and enchant­ment of Kubrick’s clas­sic hor­ror film led him to find out more about the film and through that jour­ney he stum­bled upon a realm of exhaus­tive, sub­jec­tive the­o­ries relat­ing to it. In this new doc­u­men­tary sev­eral of these ideas are analysed in great depth and with tremen­dous vivac­ity thanks to Ascher’s direction.

Some of the the­o­ries seem rel­a­tively crack-pot when first spo­ken about but as the film etches through each hypoth­e­sis and every point of ref­er­ence, they begin to take illus­tri­ous shape. Whether or not you agree with beliefs that The Shin­ing pointed to notions such as Kubrick film­ing the 1969 Moon land­ing, the geno­cide of the Native Amer­i­cans or the machi­na­tions of Hitler’s exter­mi­na­tions of the Jews, the the­o­rists always give an inter­est­ing lec­ture on why they believe it to be so.

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For film stu­dents, crit­ics and fanat­ics, this is a ground-breaking doc­u­men­tary about the debates and dis­cus­sions of film. Espe­cially for the film stud­ies fac­tion, Room 237 proves the worth of analy­sis in a direc­tor, star or genre. Not many know of the degrees of detail in which peo­ple read into films and Room 237 is an expert exam­ple of show­ing some cinema-goers’ unique per­cep­tions. As dense at it may be at points, the film runs through the bunch of the­o­ries, always with more than one astound­ing exam­i­na­tion. Fur­ther­more, Ascher uses snip­pets from var­i­ous hor­ror films to envi­sion some of the interviewee’s sto­ries (many clips of peo­ple in cin­e­mas cor­re­spond­ing with the­o­rist X talk­ing about their first expe­ri­ence of The Shin­ing, for exam­ple), thus alle­vi­at­ing some of the bland­ness that comes from only hear­ing the voices of the Shin­ing enthusiasts.

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It will not be to everyone’s taste and its commercial-fate may not be up to par with the reg­u­lar Hol­ly­wood releases, but even with the slight­est bit of suc­cess (no doubt it will sur­pass what might be expected of it) it could eas­ily become the start of a new trend in film-orientated doc­u­men­tary film­mak­ing. Ascher and pro­ducer Tim Kirk have already noted in inter­views the wealth of study with the films of David Lynch and Ale­jan­dro Jodor­owsky (to which any film fan could add on an array of other direc­to­r­ial names) and so the oppor­tu­nity to do what Ascher and Kirk have done is excit­ingly open. Room 237 is an eye-opening film, not only for The Shin­ing, but for what it means to per­ceive film; eas­ily one of the finest cel­e­bra­tions of cin­ema – and with hav­ing just explored one exam­ple in the plethora of movie history.


Degaussing | Wobbly distortions, discolorations and frame overlaps.

Degauss­ing is the process of decreas­ing or elim­i­nat­ing a per­sis­tent mag­netic field gen­er­ated by a per­ma­nent mag­net. It is named after Carl Friedrich Gauss, an early researcher in the field of mag­net­ism. Due to mag­netic hys­tere­sis it is gen­er­ally not pos­si­ble to reduce a mag­netic field com­pletely to zero, so degauss­ing typ­i­cally induces a very small “known” field referred to as bias. Degauss­ing was orig­i­nally applied to reduce ships’ mag­netic sig­na­tures dur­ing WWII. Degauss­ing is also used to reduce mag­netic fields in CRT mon­i­tors and to erase mag­netic media.

When a degausser is placed over the VCR as a VHS tape plays, the image and audio are erased and dis­torted in real time. As infor­ma­tion is wiped and rearranged on the tapes, inter­est­ing wob­bly dis­tor­tions, dis­col­orations and frame over­laps occur. The dis­tor­tions are permanent.

Hunter Longe is an emerg­ing San Fran­cisco artist inspired by the visual by-products of mag­netic data era­sure or degauss­ing. He inves­ti­gates the idea of destruc­tion as a medium for cre­ation. Obscu­ra­tion, nega­tion, dis­tor­tion and dema­te­ri­al­iza­tion become the for­mal and con­cep­tual residue of his meta-magnetic, process-reveling cre­ations. Hunter is also a found­ing mem­ber of Drone Dun­geon Col­lec­tive.

Orig­i­nally formed by the spon­ta­neous con­ver­gence of _______ and _______, the group has evolved to include other like-minded indi­vid­u­als such as _______, and _______. Pri­mar­ily har­ness­ing video, instal­la­tion, and new media, their out­put is a con­stant dia­logue between obscu­rity and clar­ity. The col­lec­tive work hints at a new form of Brecht­ian dis­tanc­ing through the appli­ca­tion of a degraded aes­thetic, the destruc­tion of tra­di­tional nar­ra­tive, and removal of orig­i­nal con­text. Based in the San Fran­cisco Bay Area, Drone Dun­geon patiently awaits the day of the union­iza­tion of their minds and your soul (Now).

Com­mis­sioned by The Pop­u­lar Work­shop the fol­low­ing short doc­u­men­tary exam­ines the work of Hunter Longe.


Hello Kitty Airlines!

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The Taipei-based air­line Eva Air is tak­ing adorable to the skies. Eva Air has had Hello Kitty-themed jets since 2005, but they debuted three new jets this win­ter (the first flight launched on Decem­ber 26, 2011, fly­ing from Taipei to Tokyo) in cel­e­bra­tion of the airline’s 20th anniversary.

The three jets in the lat­est fleet, all A330s, each have a them: apple, magic and global. Not exactly self explanatory.

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Along with the paint jobs, there are over 100 in-flight ser­vice items pas­sen­gers get when tak­ing a Hello Kitty jet. At check-in, pas­sen­gers get Hello Kitty board­ing passes and bag stick­ers. There are also head­rest cov­ers, uten­sils, snack, hand soap and lotion all in accor­dance with the theme. Did we men­tion the flight atten­dants? They all wear Hello Kitty aprons and insignia. The air­line also boasts an entire Chinese-language Hello Kitty web­site for extreme fans.

Even the food is in the shape of the fuck­ing Kitty. You’ll be puk­ing pink after try­ing the Happy Meal.

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